Contaminated Shots Expose Thousands of People to Meningitis


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Here’s yet another example of modern medicine, and big-pharm, doing more harm than good. Recently, 105 cases of noncontagious yet deadly fungal meningitis erupted due to exposure to contaminated steroids. The medical community estimates that upwards of 13,000 people may have been exposed.

Believed to have come from a contaminated batch of spinal steroid injections intended to treat chronic back pain, the injections and the subsequent infection have killed 8 people so far. Produced by New England Compounding Center (NECC), based out of Massachusetts, all potentially affected products have been recalled, and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is conducting an investigation. Until then, the NECC has surrendered its license to operate.

The fungus was found in sealed vials of the steroids in question, and these products were distributed to 76 medical facilities before the recall took effect. Here is a list of the 76 centers in question listed on the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention.

Although this is the most recent case, there are various dangers of pharmaceuticals, especially in the US. It is estimated that 10% of medications administered in the U.S. are manufactured in facilities that do not answer to the FDA, and are therefore not regulated to the same standards as others are.

However, sadly enough, the FDA itself is not the end-all, be-all of overseers: they are still, according to several experts, complicit in the use and poor regulation of vaccines containing harmful ingredients like aluminum hydroxide. This newest issue is both incredibly sad and hopefully is a call to action on putting measures in place to help prevent such occurrences from happening again.

Sources:

http://www.cnn.com/2012/10/07/health/meningitis-exposure/index.html
http://abcnews.go.com/Health/fungal-meningitis-outbreak-reaches-105-cases-deaths/story?id=17424832#.UISUicXR4fV
http://naturalsociety.com/13000-people-exposed-contaminated-shots-rare-fungal-meningitis/